Author Topic: The Matchmaker aka Shizuoka ST-N retrofit  (Read 7404 times)

mc

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The Matchmaker aka Shizuoka ST-N retrofit
« on: August 08, 2015, 01:08:49 PM »
Time for another thread move :-)

I'm actually going to be needing this machine working fairly soon, as I've got a job that will become so much easier on a larger machine with a 4th axis, so I'll get the previous posts from the original thread over on the Machsupport forum copied here, then do a bit explaining.


Quote from: mc January 13, 2013, 11:52:36 PM
First off, I'm blaming Hood for this. If it wasn't for him pointing me in the direction of this mill, I would of been happily on my way to building a nice desktop sized router!

Anyway, after Hood's help, a few months ago I became the owner of a Matchmaker mill. The actual knee mill is a Shizouka ST-N, with a Summit aka One Arm Bandit tool changer.


Shizouka ST-N by mc_mtb, on Flickr

After removing the head, and with some questionable use of a forklift and some skates, it made it into the workshop.

In Position by mc_mtb, on Flickr

I'm not in a great rush to get this machine up and running as I've got various other projects/jobs that have priority, but inbetween swapping bits in my lathe, I've been tracing wires, doing some cleaning, and getting the autolube up and running. After cleaning out the autolube unit, I filled it up and left it running overnight to see if any oil appeared on the ways. And despite managing to pump half a litre out the resevoir, nothing appeared anywhere it should, or even on the floor. The oil was finally located sitting in a recess under the table, which had a blocked drain hole, and was getting there because of a burst alloy pipe.
While having the ballscrew support of the end of the table, I stripped and cleaned the distribution block, and found two of the Bijur metering units are blocked, so I stripped the other distribution blocks, and found one more blocked on the knee, along with the main quill one. Buying some new metering blocks is on this weeks list of jobs.

Here's the distribution block refitted with a new copper pipe -

Autolube Distribution by mc_mtb, on Flickr

As it stands, my plan is to use a Kflop with Kanalog running through Mach for the main control, with high voltage steppers and drivers for the axis running closed loop through the Kflop.
I'd like servos, but I can't justify the cost at the moment. 3 steppers and drivers are roughly the same cost as a servo for a single axis, so I'll live with the slowness of steppers for now, however by using the Kflop upgrading to servos later will be a pretty straightforward job.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2015, 09:51:19 PM by Admin »

mc

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Re: The Matchmaker aka Shizouka ST-N retrofit
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2015, 01:13:27 PM »
Quote from: mc on January 14, 2013, 04:49:49 PM
Some carberetor cleaner worked wonders on the metering units, as it's pretty good at disolving the remains of oil/varnish. The ones that couldn't be unblocked were all full of black solidified oil, which given the size of orifices, would be pretty much impossible to unblock without dismantling them. Boiling them up in some detergent might work, but they're not that expensive to replace, plus the only way to get to the quill one is with the head off, and I ain't risking having to take it back of for the sake of trying to save a few pounds!

I filled the auto lube up with ATF last night and left it running, and there's a coating of red in most places where oil should be, although there's at least one pipe leaking. I noticed it was pretty badly pitted when I connected everything back up, but had hoped it wasn't that bad. I just hope I can get the other end off and back on without having to remove the table.

The main pipe was pretty badly corroded, I'm guessing caused by the drain hole being blocked, so it's probably been sitting under coolant/water for a while. I think the final nail was the ballscrew spring cover hasn't been sitting in it's housing right so when I moved the table to full travel it's been pushed down and caught the pipe. The ways aren't exactly in pristine condition, but they seem clean enough, and only obvious damage are a few scrapes most likely from bits of swarf that have been caught over the years.

Those servos are tempting, but I'm skint until the end of the month!

As usual, when going back over the original posts, I notice things worth mentioning.
The one here, is the ATF. This was something I happened to read by a service engineer on a forum somewhere, that when doing servicing, they used to swap the waylube to ATF and let it run until was through the system. This way they could tell by the red fluid, that oil was reaching everywhere it should be and the autoluve system was good, rather than trying to guess if the oil on the ways was fresh.

mc

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Re: The Matchmaker aka Shizouka ST-N retrofit
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2015, 01:15:41 PM »
Quote from: mc on January 27, 2013, 01:03:17 PM
The autolube is now back together, and working with the exception of 1 partially blocked metering unit, but it's one of two on the same slide, so it can wait for now.
Just need to get a new bearing for the X-axis motor support/extension block so I can get all the X-axis mounts back on.

I've pretty much made a decision on the axis motors, but am currently trying to decide what to do about the spindle motor.
It's a 2.2kw (3hp) 440V only motor, and the only three phase I have is via a rotary converter, which I'd like to avoid using.

Quote from: mc on February 17, 2013, 09:41:35 PM
Progress has been slow due to the usual 'too many jobs/projects, not enough hours in the day' syndrome, but I have managed to get a few bits cleaned and back on. There were a couple bearings in the head, and the x-axis extension support bearing that were very rough, so they've all been renewed. The head is now just needing lifted back on, which will be a two man lift back onto the table, followed by lots of handle cranking and some brute force.

I'm opting to drive the spindle motor with a 240V VFD for now. It does mean I lose power above the base frequency (29Hz), but it means I get a working spindle for not very much money until I decide what a longer term option will be.

I've also been working on what IO is required, and how that's all going to be acheived.
I ordered a kflop and kanalog tonight, which will be dealing with all the critical stuff, and I'm looking to use modbus for all the non-critical stuff. I'm not sure if the modbus will be through the Kflop or straight into Mach, or possibly a mix of both.

mc

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Re: The Matchmaker aka Shizouka ST-N retrofit
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2015, 01:17:28 PM »
Quote from: mc on June 21, 2013, 11:57:25 PM
After being distracted by another fairly major project for a few months, I'm now back on the Matchmaker.

The head got lifted back on at the beginning of March, quickly followed by the spindle motor.

Head On! by mc_mtb, on Flickr

I did manage to get some time to start stripping the old wiring out, where I discovered another terminal board buried in the back.
I know the machine had already been retrofitted once, so I'm guessing this board, which was behind the rear access panel, which itself had another control cabinet mounted in front of it, is from the original setup.

Internal Terminal Board by mc_mtb, on Flickr


After much crawling around, this evening I finally got all the old controller wiring out the main cabinet along with the old transformers/contactors, and the only wiring left coming out the back of the mill is for bits still attached the machine. One of the next jobs on the list will be tracing and marking all the remaining wires.

Final thing I done tonight, was wire up the spindle motor to the VFD and run the spindle up to speed. The high/low shifter works, and the varispeed works with minimal noise.


Next step in my plan is to start getting bits into the control cabinet. Just need to decide on what mini-ITX motherboard to use, as AS-Rocks seem to be hard to find of late.

mc

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Re: The Matchmaker aka Shizouka ST-N retrofit
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2015, 02:06:42 PM »
So this project has been continually bumped down the todo list since the last post over two years ago.
First by the Cyclone retrofit, which took nearly 6 months to finish, and then I bought the little Denford Novamill to machine the required tool holders for the Cyclone turret, which then meant I had a CNC mill for all the little bits I wanted to make. That then lead to spending a couple months making a little probing machine, which then took me upto a frantic few months of totally unrelated machinery repairs/modifications (doing a complete tractor gearbox rebuild in the middle of winter in an unheated workshop is not on my list of things to do again!).

Anyway, fast forward to the present, and I've got a part that could really do with a 4th axis to machine, and I'd like to get this mill running becuase as nice as the Novamill is to use, it's just not big enough for lots of things I do.

To bring things up to date, I'll quickly run over the previous posts to my current plans.
The initial plan to run the spindle from 240V is gone. The Cyclone came with a 400V VFD spindle which runs just fine from my RPC, so I'm going to do the same with the Matchmaker. That way I'll get the full 3KW of spindle power if required.

For the additional inputs and outputs, the Modbus plan is gone. Literally weeks after completing the Cyclone retrofit and having to use a PLC via Modbus to get enough IO for the ATC, Dynomotion announced their Konnect board. Each board adds 32 inputs and 16 outpus, and you can add upto 4 boards, so everything can be handled directly by the KFlop. I did consider still using a PLC for the toolchanger as costs would ultimately be similar, but some of the IO is shared by the actual mill and the toolchanger, so it would of lead to a fair bit of extra complexity, both in the hardware and the programming, implementing the various failsafes.


In between the other projects I've been working on, and waiting on parts/tools, I've been working on the toolchanger. More specifically working out the required sequences. Having spent far many more hours than I'm willing to admit going over the wiring diagrams, it's amazing what can be acheived with basic components.
Take the tool out sequence for instance. To activate it, requires a single pulse on the appropriate pin, which actiavtes one half of a flip-flop, and starts a whole sequence of events. If the arm is not at the spindle, power is applied to open claw solenoid, before the Arm to Spindle solenoid is activated, then once the arm reaches the spindle/drawbar stage the claw is closed, once the claw is closed, the DB retard (used to cushion the releasing of the tool) and DB enage solenoids are activated at the same time as the DB motor is activated to release the tool. Once the timer for the DB motor is finished, the flip-flop gets flopped, and the whole sequence reverses until the arm is back at the turret, tool is in the holder, and the claw opened.
All this sequence relies on is a couple transistors (for the flip-flop), a few diodes, some resistors, and various switches.

I'm also going to be going for servos, although exact size is still being decided. The original servos would of been 3000 RPM 1KW, and I had been planning on using the equivalent Kinco servos, however I've just discovered this week that Kinco have removed the 3000RPM 1KW servos from their range, so I'm now faced with the choice of drop down to 750W servos/drives, go for 1250W 3000rpm servos/drives, or 1050W 2000RPM servos/drives.
750W is obviously cheaper, as the motors are smaller/cheaper and use smaller/cheaper drives. The larger motors both use the same drive, but the 1250W motor is cheaper due to it being a physically smaller size.
I'm not planning on buying the servos for at least another month as I want to get the toolchanger working first, so I've got plenty time to debate servos.

mc

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Re: The Matchmaker aka Shizouka ST-N retrofit
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2015, 12:06:10 AM »
I spent a bit time today going over plans for this, and a few pieces of the puzzle are slotting together.

First up, once the original ATC control boards are removed, there is plenty room to mount a bank of relays to control the solenoids. However it'll almost feel like I'm ruining a work of art by removing the original tied wiring loom -

ATC Control Board by mc_mtb, on Flickr
I've got no idea if the original control board still works, but the electric impact driver for the drawbar is getting replaced with an air impact driver (workshop roof isn't high enough for the electric one, and no replacement is available), along with a 5/3 solenoid valve, a regulator and a check valve.

I also measured up the control box panel so I can get the layout planned. The good feature of this control box is it has a built in heat exchanger, so everything contained within the control box doesn't get exposed to external air. Two cooling fans circulate air behind the heat exchanger, with one circulating air internally.

Control Cabinet mounting board by mc_mtb, on Flickr

I now have a rough layout plan for the control box now, but I'm still undecided as to whether to put the motherboard in the control box, or build it into the operator panel, as the current layout would involve the motherboard/hardisk being mounted about 10cm above the spindle VFD.

I also had another look inside the main mill body, and there are another four solenoid valves there. Three are for the Hi/Lo selector on the spindle (one master, one for high, and one for low), and one for the spindle brake. Just to ensure things are kept interesting, they are all 24VDC solenoids, with all the solenoids for the ATC being 230VAC. For some reason a couple of the ATC solenoids have been disconnected, so next job is to get the relay bank installed, identify all the solenoids, and test them. Ideally I'd like all the solenoids to be 24VDC, but replacing them all would cost quite a bit of money, but by using relays, I can swap voltages reasonably easy at a later date.

mc

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Re: The Matchmaker aka Shizouka ST-N retrofit
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2015, 11:18:42 PM »
And the rebuild begins.
The first bit of new cable went in tonight!

First cable by mc_mtb, on Flickr

Nothing exciting though. It's only 10" long, and goes from the X-axis travel switches down through the table to the Y-axis travel switch box. I only started with that particular cable as I want to get the limit switches reassembled, before the various parts get lost in the pile of boxes that got delivered this week, with one of those boxes containing far too many relays for the tool changer solenoids which is the next planned job.